design trends

6 Trends to Take With You to High Point

As you shop the market, keep in mind key trends shaping tomorrow’s home design. We share six key movements, including Mundane Made Special and Nex Gen Living, from trendwatchers at FS.

Luxury off-grid living with Living Vehicle

At its core, Living Vehicle seeks to recreate the comforts of home within a mobile milieu. The interior of LV serves as a testament to the utilization of natural and robust materials, akin to an empty canvas for personal expression. Each LV is an individual masterpiece, meticulously tailored to the unique preferences and lifestyle of its owner. The Luxury Finishes package elevates this experience with premium materials, including exquisite black walnut wood treatments, luminous white surfaces that invite natural light, abundant windows that seamlessly connect the interior with the outdoors, and the extensive use of mill finish aluminum, an eco-conscious choice.

Jewels and the jungle: the lighting trends you’re about to see everywhere inspire Villari’s latest collection

All of these luxury lighting trends go hand-in-hand, both aesthetically and thematically: The lighting styles of the 1920s and 1960s and 1970s are connected by their shared use of geometric shapes and bold colors. In the 1920s, Art Deco lighting featured geometric shapes and bright colors. In the 1960s and 1970s, there was a revival of Art Deco style, and lighting designs once again featured geometric shapes and bold colors. This time, however, there was more of a focus on function, with lighting designs used to create specific moods or atmospheres. Pendant lights with spherical or cylindrical forms, often in vibrant hues like orange, yellow, and green, became emblematic of the era’s exuberant style. The 60s and 70s designs were also ahead of their time with a deliberate focus on sustainable materials and energy use, which aligns with the values of today’s environmentally conscious consumers.

Urbanology’s Design-Driven Shoppable Vacation Rental Venture

The venture was born from designer Ginger Curtis’ own frustration while browsing for an Airbnb, unable to find a thoughtfully designed space that felt like a true experience. Everything felt dated, basirbanologyc, or beautiful in a photo but cheap and uninspiring in person. Ginger designed the first Urbanology Property to be the solution to that search.

Hudson Valley Lighting Group Debuts Spring 2023 Collections at High Point Market

Mitzi continues its Tastemakers series with Mitzi/Ariel Okin,
which serves as the designer’s first exploration into lighting.
Ariel’s love of clean lines, texture and patterns can be seen
across the fixtures, as well as less traditional design details,
such as Fifi’s scallop detailing.