Courtney Porter

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Amanda Gunawan on progressive architecture and designing products with sentimental value

Gunawan defines herself as a progressive architect. When people hear the term progressive architect they get intimidated. In her experience, people assume it means something technical and lofty, but she stands by the term. It means always improving, turning failures into opportunities. In practice that means building upon what already exists. This is the philosophy behind the name of her architecture design and build firm, The Only Way is Up. 

Inside the new Christopher Kennedy design studio in downtown Palm Springs

For designers entertaining the idea of opening their own store, Christopher Kennedy offers some sage advice. “Running a design firm, sometimes you are your own best customer,” he said. “Owning a retail store is really useful when you need to pick up some accessories last minute to art a photoshoot. You really need the same level of dedication to both [your firm and store] to maintain a cohesive brand. And you can get burned out trying to do it all.” Kennedy admitted that he was too hands-off with the retail side of the business, focusing heavily on design clients. He took some time to step back and reevaluate how he could best serve his clients and community. The result is a new, tailored showroom, tucked into a business center in downtown Palm Springs. It doesn’t have the same tourist foot traffic as the previous space, but it’s calm, crisp, and feels like home.

All the technology you need to make your furniture company competitive in 2024

Jola Interactive is a multi-disciplinary team of web development and 3D CGI specialists that offers end-to-end digital solutions to clients interested in building industry-leading eCommerce websites with 3D applications, such as visual configurators and augmented reality. With over 12 years of experience, Jola Interactive has worked with renowned North American brands in the furnishing industry, like Verellen and Hubbardton Forge – both of whom recently won Web Excellence Awards for best websites for interior designers and home remodeling, respectively.

Visit the new Jungalow pop-up on Melrose

Justina Blakeney posting by sofa and bookcase in first Jungalow pop up shop

Go inside CarbonShack: LA’s preeminent sustainable design-build firm and preview their bio-inspired products

Sustainability was always part of Greg Roth’s personal ethos, but it didn’t become the central focus of his professional life until Stephen Pallrand challenged him to design a home with zero carbon footprint. The project was Casa Zero and would become the first CarbonShack case study house in Los Angeles.

The future of marketing luxury products and why your furniture brand may become a media company

Oren John, of Product People and Product World, sat down with DNN Editor in Chief, Courtney Porter to discuss the future of luxury branding, radical experiential marketing and why your furniture company may become a media company. Click play on the video below to watch the discussion.

Restoration Hardware unveils RH England, The Gallery at historic Anyho Park

RH England, The Gallery at the Historic Aynho Park, a Magnificent 17th-Century, 73-Acre Estate with…

Why Libby Langdon is every manufacturer’s dream design partner

In addition to her many collections with Fairfield, KAS, Crystorama, A&B and Paragon, Libby Langdon also runs a robust design firm and uses her clients as R+D. The process of designing for and with her design clients informs the products she designs.

Jewels and the jungle: the lighting trends you’re about to see everywhere inspire Villari’s latest collection

All of these luxury lighting trends go hand-in-hand, both aesthetically and thematically: The lighting styles of the 1920s and 1960s and 1970s are connected by their shared use of geometric shapes and bold colors. In the 1920s, Art Deco lighting featured geometric shapes and bright colors. In the 1960s and 1970s, there was a revival of Art Deco style, and lighting designs once again featured geometric shapes and bold colors. This time, however, there was more of a focus on function, with lighting designs used to create specific moods or atmospheres. Pendant lights with spherical or cylindrical forms, often in vibrant hues like orange, yellow, and green, became emblematic of the era’s exuberant style. The 60s and 70s designs were also ahead of their time with a deliberate focus on sustainable materials and energy use, which aligns with the values of today’s environmentally conscious consumers.

Experiments In 3D-printed furniture, VR, and AI with Richard Yasmine

Richard Yasmine’s furniture and decor collections need their own wing at the MoMA. To delve…